Facebook ‘Whistleblower’ Frances Haugen Claims No One Noticed Her Browsing Sensitive Company Documents

"Whistleblower"Frances Haugen dishes on Facebook
Jim Watson/Getty

The far-left Facebook whistleblower who recently testified before Congress reportedly spent her final days at the company openly sifting through Mark Zuckerberg’s internal social network collecting sensitive documents, and no one at the firm appeared to notice.

The Wall Street Journal recently told the story of Frances Haugen, the Facebook whistleblower that provided the WSJ with the internal Facebook documents that comprised its “Facebook Files” series.

Former Facebook worker Frances Haugen flashes a tight smile

Former Facebook worker Frances Haugen flashes a tight smile (Pool/Getty)

While discussing Haugen’s role at the company and how she gained access to the internal reports and studies from one of the most powerful tech giants in the world, Haugen revealed that she had resigned from Facebook in April but stayed on at the firm for another month to hand off projects. It was during this time that she began to work her way through Facebook Workplace, the company’s internal social network.

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 23: With an image of himself on a screen in the background, Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Financial Services Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill October 23, 2019 in Washington, DC. Zuckerberg testified about Facebook's proposed cryptocurrency Libra, how his company will handle false and misleading information by political leaders during the 2020 campaign and how it handles its users’ data and privacy. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 23: With an image of himself on a screen in the background, Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Financial Services Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill October 23, 2019 in Washington, DC. Zuckerberg testified about Facebook’s proposed cryptocurrency Libra, how his company will handle false and misleading information by political leaders during the 2020 campaign and how it handles its users’ data and privacy. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Facebook logs all employee activity in Workplace, yet as Haugen began to dive deeper and deeper into the company’s internal documents, it seemed that no one was keeping track of her activity or questioned what she might want with reports and studies that did not pertain to her department.

The WSJ writes:

Ms. Haugen kept expecting to be caught, she said, as she reviewed thousands of documents over several weeks. Facebook logs employees’ activities on Workplace, and she was exploring parts of its network that, while open, weren’t related to her job.

She said that she began thinking about leaving messages for Facebook’s internal security team for when they inevitably reviewed her search activity. She liked most of her colleagues, she said, and knew some would feel betrayed. She knew the company would as well, but she thought the stakes were high enough that she needed to speak out, she said.

On May 17, shortly before 7 p.m., she logged on for the last time and typed her final message into Workplace’s search bar to try to explain her motives.

“I don’t hate Facebook,” she wrote. “I love Facebook. I want to save it.”

Breitbart News recently reported on Haugen’s testimony before Congress in which she stated that people like herself should be regulating tech giants. Breitbart News reporter Allum Bokhari wrote:

Establishment media-backed Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen testified before the Senate Commerce Committee today, telling lawmakers that they should set up a new regulatory agency to protect against the “harms” of Big Tech (including so-called disinformation and hate speech), and that people like her should get to run it.

According to Haugen, the only possible way to fix the evils of social media (at one point in the hearing, she appeared to blame Facebook for causing the events of January 6th), is to put people like her in charge of regulating it.

“Right now, the only people in the world who are trained to analyze these experiments, to understand what is happening inside of Facebook, are people who ‘grew up’ inside of Facebook, or Pinterest, or another social media company,” said Haugen.

Read more at Breitbart News here.

Lucas Nolan is a reporter for Breitbart News covering issues of free speech and online censorship. Follow him on Twitter @LucasNolan or contact via secure email at the address lucasnolan@protonmail.com

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