Former Clinton Consultant Believes ‘Dems on Track to Lose Big in 2022’

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., meets with reporters at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, July 22, 2021. Pelosi discussed her reasons for rejecting two Republicans chosen by House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy to be on the committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

A Democrat political consultant has hinted that Republicans may take back the House and Senate during the 2022 midterm elections.

Douglas Schoen served as a political consultant under President Bill Clinton and worked on the 2020 Bloomberg Presidential Campaign. Schoen claimed in an op-ed that signs are pointing to a Republican landslide come next year amid abysmal poll numbers.

“The marked decline in support for President Joe Biden and his administration nationally and in key swing states indicates that the Democratic Party could endure a blowout defeat in the 2022 midterm elections,” Schoen wrote.

The political consultant outlined the dichotomy between Biden’s current position of weakness and the more stable positions that President Barack Obama and President Clinton experienced as they approached their first midterm elections:

Moreover, Biden is in a significantly weaker position now than both of his most recent Democratic predecessors — Bill Clinton and Barack Obama — at this point in their presidencies, which suggests that Democrats could suffer even more substantial losses in 2022 than the party did in 1994 and 2010.

Specifically, Obama’s approval rating at the same point in his presidency was 19 points higher than Biden’s is now. “At the same time, a majority of voters (52 percent) approved Obama, while 41 percent disapproved, according to a Gallup survey released on Sept. 13, 2010.” After the 2010 elections, Republicans gained a House majority by adding 64 seats, while closing the gap in the senate by acquiring 6 seats.

TOPSHOT - US President Joe Biden speaks during an update on the situation in Afghanistan and the effects of Tropical Storm Henri in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, DC on August 22, 2021. (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP) (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images)

President Joe Biden speaks during an update on the situation in Afghanistan and the effects of Tropical Storm Henri in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, DC, on August 22, 2021. (Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images)

“Likewise, on Sept. 12, 1993, Clinton’s approval rating was recorded at 47 percent approve and 42 percent disapprove by a Gallup survey. To put that in context, Clinton’s net approval rating was 13 points higher than Biden’s is at the same point in his presidency,” wrote Schoen. “Yet in the 1994 midterms, Democrats lost a net of 52 House seats and Republicans picked up eight seats in the Senate.”

According to poll numbers that were published on September 8, Biden’s approval rating has dipped to 39 percent which marks the lowest of his presidency to date. The poll showed that 49 percent of Americans disapprove of the job the President is doing.

While nearly 86 percent of Democrat voters approved of Biden’s performance 2 weeks ago, 77 percent now approve of his work, marking a nine percent drop in only a week. Moreover, 39 percent of independents disapprove of Biden while 9% of Republicans approve. Forty-five percent of Americans place the responsibility for economic instability on Biden’s shoulders, while only 26 percent believe former President Donald Trump is responsible for the economic turmoil.

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