Poll: Virginia Gubernatorial Race in Statistical Tie Three Months From Election

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 10: Former Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe speaks during the North American Building Trades Unions Conference at the Washington Hilton April 10, 2019 in Washington, DC. Many Democrat presidential hopefuls attended the conference in hopes of drawing the labor vote. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images); WASHINGTON, DC …
Zach Gibson/Getty Images; Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Virginia gubernatorial race between former Virginia Democrat Gov. Terry McAuliffe and Republican Glenn Youngkin is in a statistical tie, according to a co/efficient poll released by the Hill on Friday.

According to the poll, taken just a few months away from Virginia’s gubernatorial general election, 47 percent of Virginia voters preferred McAuliffe compared to 45 percent favoring Youngkin.

However, the poll is within the three percent margin of error, meaning the general election can go either way for the Republican and Democrat this close to the election.

Roughly eight percent of the respondents said they were still undecided between granting McAuliffe a second nonconsecutive term or Youngkin the governorship.

In Virginia, governors are not allowed to run for a second consecutive term per the state’s constitution, which is why current Gov. Ralph Northam, also a Democrat, is not running for reelection.

The poll also found that women and voters ages 18 to 34 were more in favor of supporting McAuliffe.

The co/efficient poll was taken from August 8 to 9. The polling firm asked 1,200 likely general election voters with a margin of error of +/- three percent.

A similar poll in July asking a total of 1,104 likely voters provided almost identical numbers. Overall, 46.8 percent said they were in favor of McAuliffe compared to the 45 percent who said Youngkin. That poll also found that four percent were undecided.

In April, Youngkin told Breitbart News Daily winning the election is possible. He acknowledged that he would have to win a “reasonable chunk” of the votes in Northern Virginia, the Commonwealth’s liberal bastion, but said they do not need to win a majority of the region.

“We just have to get her back from the 70–30 to close to 60–40, and then with the strength that we have across our red counties, and, oh, by the way, the strength we’re seeing in Hampton Roads and suburban Richmond, we’re going to win this November,” he said.

Follow Jacob Bliss on Twitter @jacobmbliss.

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