Pelosi’s Majority Crumbles: Rep. John Yarmuth Announces Retirement

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 25: Rep. John Yarmuth (D-KY), Chairman of the House Budget Committee, listens during a virtual markup in his office on Capitol Hill on September 25, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House Budget Committee is expected to advance Democrats $3.5 trillion social spending plan during a rare …
Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Rep. John Yarmuth (D-KY), chairman of the House Budget Committee and leading the talks on infrastructure, announced Tuesday that he would not be seeking reelection.

“It’s been an incredible journey since my first campaign in 2006 until now. I will continue to fight for Louisville in Washington for another 15 months, and then, I will retire from Congress. I will have plenty more to say in the months ahead,” he tweeted along with a short video:

“This term will be my last,” he said in the short video. Yarmuth explained that he is currently in good health but, knowing the demand of the job, he’s ready to retire to spend more time with his family.

He added that despite becoming a lame-duck member, he wants to spend his time left in Congress to help pass more of the radical agenda from President Joe Biden and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), just like he’s done for the last year. The retiring congressman has voted 100 percent with Pelosi, not disagreeing on any of the significant votes with the speaker.

Breitbart News has extensively reported on Pelosi’s majority crumbling. Doing so, Breitbart News has kept track of the Democrats’ struggle to find new candidates willing to run for office and face published scrutiny. Without successfully finding recruits and many members looking to retire or run for higher office, Pelosi’s chances of keeping the slim Democrat majority in Congress are shrinking.

Democrats trying to fight to stay in the majority are also facing tough redistricting battles. Politico recently outlined the House Democrats spending their last two elections (2018 and 2020) talking about their achievements of unseating members in red districts — which have since gotten more competitive over the years — but did not realize the majority of the districts, they spend millions of dollars and hundreds of hours fighting for could disappear after redistricting.

Follow Jacob Bliss on Twitter @jacobmbliss.

.

Please let us know if you're having issues with commenting.